Using ICT in Language Teaching & Learning
 

Robert Bibeau
robert.bibeau (@) sympatico.ca

Téléphone :
450-349-3674

April 2009

Translation Sarah Lawson


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Languages of the Wider World               


The presentation  is here 

Web site of the Conference is here.


Vesion française de la présentation.




               

       Languages of the Wider World      
       Friday 17th April 2009. 
London  


1.     
SURVIVING WITH ICT IN TEACHING AND LEARNING

2.  INTEGRATING NEW TECHNOLOGIES

3.  SEVEN CONDITIONS FOR INTEGRATION

4.  EXAMPLES OF APPLICATIONS ON LINE

5.  IMPROVING LEARNING

6.  THE TEACHER AS GUIDE


Bibliographie






1. SURVIVING WITH ICT IN TEACHING AND LEARNING

I would like to explore with you the conditions for the successful integration of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Language Learning and Teaching.
 

Living with computers in our classrooms, planning, monitoring, controlling and checking the learning with these tools is stressful, even disruptive. What can we do with such a versatile tool? How can we tame the computer and the internet? How can we change our teaching practice?
 

For 30 years we have been working to integrate technology in a variety of countries.  We have been progressing at different speeds, with varying levels of success and failure; some have lost patience, claiming that we’re forever starting again from the beginning, and yet each circle of the spiral of innovation takes us further forward.


2.  INTEGRATING NEW TECHNOLOGIES

We are still able to use the qualifier ‘new’ for the simple reason that teaching and learning technology regularly provides us with new tools. First we saw teaching software (helping us with exercises, tutorials, presentations and demonstrations), then we had simulators, experiential software and software tools – (word processing, spreadsheets, data bases). I won’t go into artificial intelligence. 

Then we had email, interactive whiteboards, web1, web2, then blogs, podcasting and virtual classes or M-learning.

Despite the technology already in use, in order for language learning to take place and for this technology to be successfully integrated into teaching and learning, it must support the development of the following principles of teaching:

FIGURE 1

1 – increase contact between teachers and students

2 – raise student expectations

3 – support reactive, proactive and interactive learning

4 – facilitate immediate and efficient feedback

5 – improve and increase study and reading time

6 – encourage a variety of talents / skills

7 – value cooperation between students



Even if training technology doesn’t actually contribute to the development of these pedagogical principles, it can still prove to be a useful tool, but is it worth the effort and expense it demands?

Let’s agree from now that the main challenge in integrating the technology is not to multiply / duplicate tools. We can’t measure success by the ratio of students to computers, nor by the transmission speed on the internet.

Nevertheless, let’s admit that the more computers there are, the more often they are connected to the Internet and the more often teachers use them in their daily practice in class or in training centres. « Those who have more than five in their classroom use them more than those who have less than five! » .

In the United States, 84% of teachers consider using computers and internet access to be ways of improving the quality of teaching. However, only 26% use them regularly in class.

We need to focus on the students first and then on the technology, rather than the other way round. This is the basis of a humanist vision of and a systematic approach to technological innovation in education.

Too often in the past, the implementation of information technology has been done in an atmosphere of improvisation by osmosis and contagion by proximity. This «utopian» vision of the integration process goes like this: a teacher sets up an innovative project using ICT. The innovator thinks that his colleagues, intrigued by so much innovation and envious of his success, will spontaneously want to transform their teaching methods and take on the innovation as well.  It doesn’t work like this.

Pedagogic subversion needs to be organised and instead of this spontaneity-based vision of innovation, we need to set up a systematic and systemic approach.




3.  SEVEN CONDITIONS FOR INTEGRATION


FIGURE 2


1    

     A clear political will to support local managers in their efforts and their «unfailing»  support for teachers


2    

      Significant financial resources guaranteed annually for several years, a prerequisite for long-term planning


3    

       Large numbers of computers which are high-performing, reliable, accessible, networked and linked up to the internet for distance collaboration and learning communities.


4    

      Powerful, stable, dedicated applications which are user-friendly and which offer access to content in the language of instruction and digital resources which are well-adapted to the various subject areas.


5    

      A constant and regular flow of a large amount of information and support


6    

      A systemic integration plan which is the result of good cooperation between the education partners (teachers, headteachers, education advisors and technology experts)


7    
 

     Time for teachers, time for reflection, for training, for the planning of learning and evaluation


 Source : « A soir, on fait pas peur au monde »

 




4. EXAMPLES OF EDUCATIONAL APPLICATIONS ON LINE


ICT has proved to be effective when it is integrated into a varied teaching methodology which sets out clearly the learning activities and the various teaching methods.

Empirical, behaviourist, rationalist, cognitivist and humanist-constructivist approaches have all been associated with computer applications and reactive, proactive and interactive processes  from a technological point of view. 

Does ICT naturally favour cooperation and sharing of discoveries? Not necessarily. It’s true that ICT facilitates communication. Communication is a necessary but not the sole condition for cooperation.

In order for ICT to improve cooperation, it also needs a cooperative approach to teaching and teaching and learning activities that initiate exchange and encourage collaboration. To support cooperation, collaboration needs to be valued and competitiveness, individualism and egocentrism need to be challenged and discouraged, maybe even using ICT.


EXEMPLES

FRENCH EXERCICE     VOCABULAIRY 

ALPHABÉTISATION DES ADULTES PAR DES
ATELIERS FAMILIAUX

WIKIMINI  ENCYCLOPÉDIE DES ENFANTS


PORTFOLIO EPEARL CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY

BALADODIFFUSION

MOBI LEARNING WITH TECHNOLOGY

BLOG PUBLICATION INTERACTION





5.  IMPROVING LEARNING

Can the integration of technology nevertheless achieve better results for students? Many factors can support the achievement of this goal, in particular,  the teaching method favoured in each specific context and the way the technology is implemented in that context.

The CARET research centre (Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation) has compared hundreds of American studies measuring the effects of using ICT in school on students and their learning. It seems that, given certain conditions, using ICT does improve students’ school results.

 


     
1.     
Technology improves school results when the technological resources for teaching:

1.1 
 directly support the aims of the curriculum  
1.2 
 provide opportunities for collaboration  
1.3 
 adjust to abilities and prior experience and provide rapid feedback

2.        
The technology allows the development of higher order cognitive operations when:

2.1 
 Students are taught to apply problem-solving processes and are given opportunities to apply the technology to look for solutions
2.2 
 Students work in learning communities supported by technology to solve problems
2.3 
 Students use presentation and communication tools to process, present, edit and share the results of their work

3.   
Technology improves student motivation if they use:

3.1 
 Applications to produce, present and share their work with their peers
3.2 
 Games applications to develop basic skills and knowledge.




6.   THE TEACHER AS GUIDE

ICT brings into question not just the organisation of the teaching profession but also its professional identity and teachers’ role in a society and thus the very conditions of their ownership of their profession.

The shape of the learning imposed by ICT, which is no longer on technical lines, but rather cognitive and behavioural, is beginning to be seen in everyday life.

Teachers need to become GUIDES. This is nothing new. Guiding students has always been part of the teacher’s job. The ease with which students can access this huge bank of knowledge, which is not necessarily validated, organised, structured, interpreted or contextualised makes this aspect of the job even more important.


The teacher is the observer, the manager, the resource in the triptych

Technology

Subject-specific teaching methods

Varied approaches to teaching, whereby the student is the main agent in his or her learning within a structured and systemic teaching context.


 

Bibliographie


ALEC’S Gallery.  The networked Teacher, 2006, site consulté en février 2007.


BARRETTE, C.  Vers une métasynthèse des impacts des TIC sur l’apprentissage et l’enseignement dans les établissements du réseau collégial québécois, Bulletin Clic, Montréal, No 57, Mars 2005, Pages 18-23.

BARRETTE, C.  Réussir l’intégration pédagogique des TIC – un guide d’action de plus en plus précis, Bulletin Clic, Montréal, No 63, Janvier 2007, Pages 11-19,


BASQUE, J., ROCHELEAU, J. et L. WINER.  Une approche pédagogique pour l’école informatisée, Éditions EICEM, Montréal, Mars 1998, 25 pages.


BIBEAU, R.La recette pour l’intégration des TIC en éducation, Montréal, Février 2007  

BIBEAU, R. Des situations d’apprentissage et d’évaluation sur Internet (SAE). Infobourg, Québec, Décembre 2006,.

BIBEAU, R.  Série Stigmatisons cinq légendes urbaines. , Québec, Novembre 2006,

BIBEAU, R.  Vous avez dit société numérique du savoir?,Vie pédagogique, Québec, No 140, Septembre-octobre 2006, Pages 45-47,

BIBEAU, R.  Les  TIC à l’école :  proposition de taxinomies et analyse de quelques obstacles à leur intégration en classe,  In. Le matériel didactique et pédagogique : soutien à l’appropriation ou déterminant de l’intervention éducative, Les Presses de l’Université Laval, Québec, 2006, Pages 297-325.

BIBEAU, R.  Le réseau numérique de l’éducation, Montréal, Mars 2006,

BIBEAU, R.  Les TIC à l’école :  proposition de taxonomie et analyse des obstacles à leur  intégration. Revue de l’ÉPI, Paris, Oct. 2005.

BIBEAU, R.  Ainsi parlait Vénitia, Montréal, 2001.


 

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